13.4.17

sacred homemaking

As I sit here in the pale, quiet light, awaiting the worst storm in fifty years, I feel now and again a seawash of coolness coming through the opening window to touch me. It is only slightly chilling; mostly, it is softening. I do so love the hours before a storm.




And I love autumn too, with its gentle drawing inward. It is such a homey season. It inspires an instinct towards warming, sheltering, which seems to me like an instinct for love. I wonder if in autumn prehistoric people brought the year's last flowers into their caves, and found aesthetic pleasure in rugs, and in whatever softness they could make for themselves. There really is something so sacred about making a home here on earth, in this life - making a space of love which reflects what we experience of divine love. Making a space which keeps people warm, makes them feel safe and comfortable, so they can open themselves to love too.

Which is why I am always saddened where I hear young people being asked what they want to do with their lives, what job they want, with no consideration or respect for the possibility that they might wish more than anything to be a full-time homemaker. It's something many young women struggle with, but I wonder how many young men also feel the same, perhaps even worse, as while homemaking is thought of as a lesser option for women, it is not  thought of at all for men.




My sky is blanching, my garden growing still. Soon the rain will be here. I am going to change my weblog, to make it warmer, more cosy. Homemaking does not only happen in rooms. It happens in your heart and your creative imagination too.


8 comments:

  1. Yes, lovely homemaking can happen anywhere we wish.
    Wishing you a good storm.

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  2. I love the new look of your home on the web. So beautiful and calming, like your writing. I wish too that being a homemaker wasn't such a looked down upon thing.

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    1. thank you. I am trying to be brave keeping it up, because I fear not much respect is given to the soft and feminine ... can it be smart? can it delve into the shadows of old secret wisdoms? ... and I ought to have more earthy colours, more images of things like pit-fired pottery, etc. I love that too, but it is in the softness I find my own healing.

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    2. I think this is very brave. Softness, beauty, the feminine is so often associated with weakness. But I feel there is a connection to the mystical, the spiritual in it. And maybe that's why so many people don't value it. Because we've lost that connection. Stopped believing in magic, and the soul in things. I also find healing in softness :)

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    3. <3 you inspire me with the softness and gentle magic of what you share.

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  3. oh, i do so agree. and i am hearing quite a number of teens and young adults expressing a desire to "be able to stay at home" when they are out on their own, meaning different things to different ones, but all having a recognition that something of great value goes on at home, something that can be missed or short-changed by having to work away from home every day/all day.

    i think the goddess hestia (and all those domestic deities or spirits, domovoi and lares/penates, etc) has been sadly abandoned by us, and is overdue for elevation again. i saw this morning a graphic, neatly displaying different classical goddesses and their spheres of influence in a pretty geometric design, and there was no hestia in the picture, no home-sphere represented at all, despite that having been hugely important to ancients. even hecate has been reclaimed, but hestia has little service even amongst women. jean shinoda bolen did include her in her book on archetypes, which cheers me somewhat.

    perhaps there could be a badge for a "sisterhood of hestia"...

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    1. Hestia was so very important to the ancients. I'm sad she is being excluded now. :-( I love the idea of the sisterhood of hestia!!

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