September 13, 2017

How to Have a Real Life



I'm sure many of us have been informed more than once that we need to get a (real) life. I've made some observations and concluded that this is what such a life would be like ...

* Spent mostly out of the home. A person with a real life should be taking walks, looking at the scenery, immersing herself in nature. The home is less of a haven than a kind of artificial environment, almost prison-like, depriving her of fresh air and weather, without which she is stultified and wasting her existence. (The office or school room does not count in the same way.)

*Spent in the presence of other people. Solitary moments to refresh one's energy so that one can socialise again with cheerfulness and vitality is a good thing, but too much time spent alone is bad. Extroversion is the only natural state of a real life. Joys, sorrows, excitements, achievements, mean nothing if not shared with others (either in person or via social media.)

* Spent contributing in some definable way to society and the economy. A life taken up in the pursuit of contentment, personal understanding, or the care of family, is not real or worthwhile enough. Conversely, however, a life spent only working, without any holidays (taken in locations far distant from one's home, otherwise they aren't true holidays), and with limited connection to family, is also not a real life.

* Spent doing observable things with one's physical body. Contemplation is only of value when performed as actual meditation. Illness is acceptable if acute, but the only correct way to manage chronic illness or disability is to persevere with the above-mentioned conditions of a real life, regardless of any pain, distress, or deterioration which may result.

* Furthermore, the realness and worth of a person's life is to be determined on a daily basis by someone other than the person herself.


4 comments:

  1. Except we don't need that other someone to make the evaluation, we've been trained too well to do it to ourselves....

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  2. Everyone has a place of comfort.. extrovert, introvert, or somewhere in-between. I'm a loner, with a disability. When I can I wander, but almost always alone.. my place of comfort. Many don't understand me, but I understand me. I think we should listen to our inner selves. That is where it all begins. ♥

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  3. yes, this is pretty much the message of the external informational world, isn't it?

    sigh.

    thankfully, i don't accept it. and i dearly hope that many others see it for the sham that it truly is.

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  4. It hurts my heart how true this is. And then, because we are constantly bombarded by people telling us we need a real life, we try so hard to live up to societies expectations and end up breaking down because we are JUST. NOT. LIKE. THAT.

    And in the end, some of us are labelled lazy, or babies, or liars.

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