the .moon's. quiet. daughter


h.o.m.e ............s.a.r.a.h...e.l.w.e.l.l ............ e.l.s.e.w.h.e.r.e .............s.e.e.d.s...&...s.t.a.r.s ............d r e a m i n g...t.a.l.e.s





July 11, 2017

on being different as a writer




I visited a bookshop today. It threatened to be a poignant experience, because yesterday I discovered that the costs of getting the extended, enriched edition of Deep In The Far Away professionally printed are quite likely, at this time, prohibitive. (Partly that's due to high postage costs from New Zealand, and partly because I can't imagine anyone being willing to pay $30-40 for my paperback novel.) For years, it has been a dream to see my book on a proper bookshop shelf. And yet, today, I realised I no longer had that dream to the same degree.

I still want my books to be read, and liked, and my bravest dreams see them being reviewed and recommended by Important People. (It's exciting enough when that happens with blogposts and tweets.) But there's a feeling about being self-published ... about being a wildflower along the path ... about offering something deliberately different from what's on the shelf ... that is special enough in its own way (although to be a famous writer would be most special of all, of course!)

I actually like what I've done with Deep In The Far Away. I am going through the final edits but keep getting caught up reading for my own enjoyment. I've written the kind of book I want to read, and that's important to me. But I know it isn't a typical novel. It starts slowly. It has a whole lot of description. It doesn't end neatly (although the new edition has an epilogue which may answer some of the questions people have asked me over the years.) Much of the drama involves whether or not the heroine gets to go on afternoon strolls. I struggle to find books like it on the proper bookshop shelves, which is why I wrote it. And perhaps why I can't quite envision it on those shelves, amongst all the bright covers.

Having said that, I would love to know my book was being held against hearts, tucked under pillows, stacked on home shelves. For the sake of this, I may be able to go ahead with hand-binding a few  copies, as I did with my first book Otherwise. And then signing those copies and sending them off with flowers pressed between their pages. Because small and quiet can be special, maybe, for all that we're conditioned to dream big.


bookplate by Alphonse Inoue

13 comments:

  1. I would certainly love to hold your book in my hands. Reading on screen takes a lot of the joy out of reading for me, making it a chore. Short blog posts are fine, but a whole book! That takes stamina, and is not easy on the eyes. I don't know what your self-publishing plans would have been, but Lulu.com seems a very economical way to do it. Perhaps not ideal, but worth considering (if you haven't already). But if it cannot be done on paper, I will still be interested in the electronic version. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. thank you :-) I am looking at lulu, its still an initial outlay, impossible without paid preorders. We'll see :-)

      Delete
  2. Not doable in large amounts, no, but I do love the notion of sending out copies with pressed flowers in them, a little bright feather.

    I have a mind to doing that with library books before returning them, would that be vandalism?

    ReplyDelete
  3. Would love a book with flowers between its pages :)

    ReplyDelete
  4. i would love a copy of the small and beautiful printing... but do not despair of ever getting the bigger printed distribution. rather, say "not yet...but someday"...it may still come to pass!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. this warmed my heart, thank you :-)

      Delete
  5. I would truly love to experience your writing in printed form. I have had some success with both Createspace and Lulu in bringing my books to printed format, and you do not even have to sell them, just keep them private. I do absolutely adore the idea of a book with pressed flowers, little treasures that could travel to all of the corners of the earth from your own little centre. That is a gorgeous and inspiring idea. <3

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you :-) As I said to Therese, there is a cost involved with Lulu and Createspace too, and so I must think about it to decide if its worthwhile, especially as the books are non-profit fundraisers. I find being money-poor is something alot of people can't fully envision. :-)

      Delete
    2. Have you considered some kind of crowd-funding, getting people to preorder to raise the funds for publication? You have a lot of readers who would love to be able to support you to make this happen.

      Delete
    3. Thank you :-) As these books are fundraisers, it doesn't make sense to go with Createspace which charges quite a bit for their services. If I set the book price at $15 US, I'd get only about a third from that for our fundraiser. Lulu seems better, but I'm unsure what the quality will be and also they are US-based whereas I'm on the other side of the world. It's one of the main reasons I've gone with ebooks thus far - almost no cost to produce, therefore all the money from book purchases goes into the fund (which is non-profit).

      Also, its very kind of you to say, but I don't really have a lot of readers ;-) But I do so much appreciate your kind encouragement.

      Delete
  6. I would pay thirty or forty dollars to have a physical book of yours. But small and quiet with a flower pressed between its pages is pure magic and what I love best of all.♥

    ReplyDelete