Inside the Magic

“Lara walked along the tracks following a path worn by pilgrims and then turned into the fields. Here she stopped and, closing her eyes, took a deep breath of the flower-scented air of the broad expanse around her. It was dearer to her than her kin, better than a lover, wiser than a book. For a moment she rediscovered the purpose of her life. She was here on earth to grasp the meaning of its wild enchantment and to call each thing by its right name, or, if this were not within her power, to give birth out of love for life to successors who would do it in her place.” - Boris Pasternak.




“Ever since childhood Yurii Andreievich had been fond of woods seen at evening against the setting sun. At such moments he felt as if he too were being pierced by shafts of light. It was as though the gift of the living spirit were streaming into his breast, piercing his being and coming out at his shoulders like a pair of wings. The archetype that is formed in every child for life and seems for ever after to be his inward face, his personality, awoke in him in its full primordial strength, and compelled nature, the forest, the afterglow, and everything else visible to be transfigured into a similarly primordial and all-embracing likeness of a girl. Closing his eyes, "Lara," he whispered and thought, addressing the whole of his life, all God's earth, all the sunlit space spread out before him.” - Boris Pasternak




When I was a child, I would stand in the deep, old forest and feel the magic of life weaving and wishing itself awake all around me. I read fairy tales and knew they were real in a special way that had nothing to do with scientific reality. Every night, I sat a little lost in a huge, half-empty house and listened to heaven singing the silence. 

Maybe that is why I always revered writers just the same as doctors and presidents. They ... some of them, and especially the long-ago ones who wrote for children ... know too about the enchantment, and have all the right words to share it.


6 comments:

  1. I have never read Boris Pasternak, but now I want to.

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    1. I love many of the old Russian writers. I actually wanted to name my daughter Larissa, from Dr Zhivago, but my family said they'd call her Lara (instead of Lissa) so I didn't do it. ;-)

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  2. Oh, I love Pasternak!

    Your shots are magical.

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    1. thank you. since you're one of my favourite photographers, it always delights me to receive these kind compliments from you.

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  3. Another lover of old Russian writers here. The passages you've chosen take my breath away, thank you! And is it strange to admit that I'm especially delighted to know that men feel these things too : )?

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